PRESENTATIONS

of the 2nd Baltic Maritime Spatial Planning Forum

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DAY 1 / 23 NOVEMBER 2016

WELCOME & OPENING SPEECHES
Video file is available here >>

Moderator: Axel Wenblad, Senior advisor and independent MSP expert

  • Jacek Zaucha, Chairman of VASAB Committee on Spatial Planning and Development of the Baltic Sea Region
  • Thomas Johansson, Head of Marine Spatial Planning and Maritime Affairs, Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management
  • Haitze Siemers, Head of Unit for Maritime Policy in the Baltic and North Sea, EC Directorate General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries

PLENARY SESSION

Moderator: Axel Wenblad, Senior advisor and independent MSP expert

PANEL DISCUSSION
Video is available here >>

Transforming borders into solutions – 7 things we improved by working together
Moderator: Axel Wenblad, Senior advisor and independent MSP expert

  • Ingūna Urtāne, Head of Spatial Planning Department, Ministry of Environmental Protection and Regional Development of the Republic of Latvia
  • Kai Trümpler, Head of Unit Maritime Spatial Planning, Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency, Germany
  • Thomas Johansson, Head of Marine Spatial Planning and Maritime Affairs, Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management
  • Katarzyna Krzywda, Director of Maritime Economy Department, Ministry of Maritime Economy and Inland Navigation, Poland
  • Tiina Tihlman, Ministerial Adviser at Department of the Built Environment, Ministry of Environment of Finland
  • Anni Konsap, Adviser of the Planning Department, Estonian Ministry of the Finance
  • Peter Dam, Nautical Adviser, Danish Maritime Authority

PARALLEL WORKING SESSIONS

Moderator:
Axel Wenblad, Senior advisor and independent MSP expert

Recommendations for four sectors – energy, shipping, environment and fishery – for two cases and for six countries for intensively and less intensively used sea areas – these are only some of the challenges that have been discussed under the frame of BalticSCOPE project.

How to maintain active cooperation between countries in the Baltic Sea region, where are no borders that can be seen?
What is the necessary/minimum knowledge base for fruitful cross-border maritime planning exercise and who can build and maintain it?
BalticSCOPE team has developed not only important planning proposals/next steps but also practical recommendations which are applicable right now.

This session was devoted for the discussion of the main outcomes of both cases – Southwest Baltic and Central Baltic – and for the demonstration on how MSP solutions vary in cases depending on the national planning objectives and scales.

Presentations and speakers:

Moderator:
Alda Nikodemusa, Deputy Head of VASAB Secretariat

Due to more intensive usage of the sea space there is a growing demand to know resources of ecosystems as well as social, cultural and economy aspects we are dealing with. All these topics are crucial for sustainable MSP. The working session will focus on forward looking adaptive planning of marine space, transnational MSP, bottom up marine management, marine protected areas, coastal planning and MSP geography, process and governance from the researchers perspective.

Presentations and speakers:

Moderator: Talis Linkaits, Head of VASAB Secretariat

Two working sessions were dedicated to very practical examples of how maritime spatial planning is applied in practice in the Baltic Sea region countries and in other European sea basins. High level practitioners shared their experience from cases all around the Europe covering various topics – e.g. imbedding MSP in the national planning system, strategic approaches, transboundary challenges, stakeholder involvement, achievements and failures so far.

Presentations and speakers for the 1st session:

Moderator: Johanna Egerup, Senior Adviser at Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management

Maritime Spatial Planning sets a new order for how planning issues are dealt with. Instead of only single-sector planning, a holistic perspective and an open process of dealing with all interests at sea are introduced. Defence is an established use of the sea claiming vast areas that are well known, but also classified areas, and defence requirements can be difficult to handle within the long-term time horizon of MSP.

In this working session the pros and cons of MSP in a defence perspective were discussed:

  • The open process of MSP versus the secrecy need of national defence.
  • From separate planning issues at sea to the holistic perspective of MSP – how does it affect the interest of national defence?

Presentations and speakers:

Moderator: Johanna Egerup, Senior Adviser at Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management

This session discussed obstacles and enablers for planning across national borders as identified in the first project bringing together authorities in charge of MSP working in the Baltic Sea – Baltic SCOPE.

Participants got acquainted with planners’ experiences from concrete transboundary collaboration. Also, what researchers and planners in the project have learned about how to monitor and evaluate transboundary planning collaboration, in order to follow and improve transboundary processes.

Presentation.

Speakers:

  • Michael Kull and Andrea Morf, Baltic SCOPE lessons learned, Senior Research Fellows at Nordregio (Nordic Centre for Spatial Development)
  • Riku Varjopuro, Baltic SCOPE monitoring & evaluation framework, Head of unit at the Finnish Environment Institute, Environmental Policy Centre, Interactive Governance Unit
  • Hannah Thomas,Senior Programme Officer of the Marine Programme, United Nations Environment Programme – World Conservation Monitoring Centre
  • Anni Konsap,Advisor of the Planning Department at the Estonian Ministry of Finance
  • Jan Schmidtbauer Crona, Senior Analyst at Swedish Agency of Marine and Water Management
  • Wesley Flannery, Lecturer in the School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering (SPACE) and Institute of Environmental and Spatial Planning (ISEP) at Queen’s University, Belfast

Moderators: Kira Gee and Andreas Kannen, Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, ICES Working Group for Marine Planning and Coastal Zone Management

Understanding what is valued by people in a marine context is important to mitigate potential conflicts between uses. The ICES Working Group for Marine Planning and Coastal Zone Management has developed a method for identifying places of cultural importance on the coast and in the sea. Termed the “culturally significant areas (CSA) concept”, this approach establishes what is valued by people, where these values are located, when in time they are relevant and to whom. Once identified, CSAs can be subjected to a risk management approach, based on establishing the key qualities that are needed to sustain each CSA and the risks that various developments might pose to these qualities.

This workshop presented the concept of CSAs as well as some pilot applications, with the intention of discussing whether and how the approach might be incorporated into actual MSP processes and decision-making.

The aim was to discuss the opportunities and constraints of the CSA approach as perceived by practitioners, helping to develop the concept further and move it towards an operational phase. The works session will have short initial presentations followed by guided group discussions and a summary plenary discussion.

Presentation.

Work session structure:

  • The CSA concept – origins and key principles
  • Applying the CSA concept in practice – a case study from the UK
  • Mapping Cultural Ecosystem Services and CSA – a case study from Sweden
  • Group discussion round 1: Practical opportunities and constraints of the CSA concept from the perspective of planners
  • Group discussion round 2: How would the application of the CSA concept work in MSP practice?
  • Presentation to the plenary and summary discussion.

Presenters and facilitators:
Kira Gee, Andreas Kannen, Christian Fischer

Moderator: Talis Linkaits, Head of VASAB Secretariat

Two working sessions were dedicated to very practical examples of how maritime spatial planning is applied in practice in the Baltic Sea region countries and in other European sea basins. High level practitioners will share their experience from cases all around the Europe covering various topics – e.g. imbedding MSP in the national planning system, strategic approaches, transboundary challenges, stakeholder involvement, achievements and failures so far.

Presentations and speakers for the 2nd session:

Moderator: Angela Schultz-Zehden, Contract lead manager

Funded by DG MARE, the EU MSP Platform is a service for Member States to share relevant knowledge and experiences on MSP. It acts as the central exchange forum for MSP processes and projects.

The working session presented opportunities provided on the EU MSP Platform website and the additional services that the Platform offers. The website features extensive searchable databases on MSP practices, projects, and funding programmes, as well as training opportunities and a continuously updated events page.

You will also find comprehensive information on the status and content of MSP in the Member States and a description of MSP in the European sea basins. The Platform is based on a personal approach and operated via a dedicated team of experts with offices in all European sea-basins.

Platform experts from the various sea-basins presented the status MSP in their sea basins with focus on what those can offer as ‘good practice’ to the MSP processes in the Baltic Sea Region as well as vice versa would be interested to ‘gain’ from the Baltic Sea Region.

Presentations and speakers:

DAY 2 / 24 NOVEMBER 2016

Moderator: Didzis Ustups, Head of Laboratory at Marine Division, Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment

Fishing constitutes a traditional activity at sea and is likely to be affected by other new or expanded uses of the sea demanding space. Fishery in the Baltic Sea is transboundary while most of the fish stocks are located in Pan-Baltic level. In the session fishery biologists, marine planning experts and stakeholders discussed national and Pan-Baltic level planning experience and challenges to illustrate fishery interest in MSP. Different approaches (logbook, Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) data) were presented from previous studies and recommendations for the Baltic Sea MSP were discussed.

Presentations and speakers:

Moderator: Jan Schmidtbauer Crona, Senior Analyst at Swedish Agency of Marine and Water Management

The session gave an inspiration, methods and examples of how you can implement the ecosystem approach (aka ecosystem based approach) in maritime spatial planning. After a brief background on the roots of the approach the tools developed in the Baltic SCOPE project were presented. Concrete examples were given from the national level including presentations from Latvian and Swedish MSP. Input to the discussion on the application of the ecosystem approach were provided from a German research project.

The aim was to develop a deeper understanding and prepare for action.

Presentations and speakers:

Moderator: Michael Gilek, Professor at Södertörn University

MSP implementation in the Baltic Sea is diverse! One sea – nine countries – different geo-physical conditions, planning cultures, time-horizons, sea use situations, national interests, extents of power decentralisation and institutional arrangements. Within this diverse sea basin wide context a key ambition of MSP is to work towards greater cooperation to support more coherency of sea use in pursuit of sustainable marine use. This is harder said than done and will require different types of collaboration among a wide range of actors to ensure a cohesive approach. In BONUS BALTSPACE project we call these integration challenges.

The following types of integration challenges have been identified: Transboundary / cross-border integration, sector & policy integration, stakeholder integration and knowledge integration.

Project partners explore in five case studies in what way integration manifests itself in MSP processes as well as what are the enablers and constraints for integration. When thinking about these particular cases also reflect on the relationships between the integration challenges and how they affect prospects for sustainable development (ecological, social and economic) of the sea:

  • MSP cooperation at a pan-Baltic sea-basin level
  • Lithuanian-Latvian cross-border MSP interactions
  • Federalism and MSP in Germany
  • Transboundary and cross-sector MSP interactions in the Sound, Sweden and Denmark
  • Fisheries stakeholders and conflicts linked to MSP in Poland

Presenation.

Speakers:

  • Anne Luttmann, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde (IOW)
  • Nerijus Blažauskas, Coastal Research and Planning Institute (CORPI)
  • Kira Gee, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht
  • Andrea Morf, Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment
  • Jacek Zaucha, Chairman of VASAB Committee on Spatial Planning and Development of the Baltic Sea Region
  • Jakub Turski, Maritime Institute in Gdansk

Moderator: Angela Schultz-Zehden, SUBMARINER & EU MSP Platform

Maritime cultural heritage (MCH) is often seen as an obstacle for regional or sectorial development instead of perceiving it as a common resource for Blue Growth. The Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) processes create a new opportunity for facilitating a joint understanding among stakeholders. At the same time this requires MCH experts to learn how to express their needs in ‘spatial’ terms and to find adequate planning criteria. Within this session, the EUBSR flagship project ‘MCH-MSP’ is presented, which is in the 2nd stage of the BSR Interreg Programme application. The project shall lead to the provision of quality information and planning evidence on MCH assets and areas for MSP processes.

Presentations and speakers:

Moderator: Anda Ruskule, Environmental expert, Spatial Planning Department, Ministry of Environmental Protection and Regional Development (MoEPRD)

Marine protected areas (MPA) network is the core mechanism for protection of marine biodiversity through designating suitable areas for protection of nature values and by managing human activities within those areas. The coherence of MPA network is characterised by its connectivity (i.e. functional interconnection between the sites and conditions for spreading of species) as well as the representativeness of species and habitat coverage. MSP can serve as important tool for improving the connectivity through regulation of the sea uses activities as well as identification of areas of high ecological value to be included in the network.

The topics for discussion:

  • The role of MSP in development of a coherent MPA network
  • Potentials for pan-Baltic co-operation on building common evidence base for extending of the MPA network and ensuring environmental interests within MSP
  • Co-ordination of the management requirements between MPAs and MSP

Presentations and speakers:

Moderators: Áslaug Ásgeirsdóttir, associate professor, Bates College, Politics
Michael Gilek, Professor at Södertörn University, School of Natural Science, Technology and Environmental Studies Centre for Baltic and East European Studies
Riku Varjopuro, Head of Interactive Governance Unit, Finnish Environment Institute, Environmental Policy Centre

Maritime spatial planning process aims at coordinating human activities at sea with objectives to foster growth of marine economies, prevent conflicts and protect the health of marine ecosystems. A maritime spatial plan that is an output of the process expresses in spatial terms the decisions reached in the process. Research on spatial planning on land has shown that effectiveness of spatial planning, especially of the more general and strategic types of planning, is prone to several uncertainties. To reach the objectives MSP process and its outputs should steer decision-making of public and private actors in various sectors of economy and administration. In other words, the effectiveness of spatial planning comes from the ability of the participants to coordinate activities through the interaction of different bureaucracies, while there seldom is one actor with direct means to ensure implementation. There are also limitations on what sort of decisions can be expressed in spatial terms.

This working session explored how MSP can influence decision making procedures to facilitate coordination of marine activities.

Presentations and speakers:

Moderator: Elina Veidemane, VASAB Secretariat, project manager

Successful implementation of MSP depends on good quality data and information, as this has already widely acknowledged at the EU and Baltic Sea Region policy and project level. Data quality, accessibility and availability are crucial when considering transboundary context where consistent use of data is an important prerequisite for creating a coherent network of maritime spatial plans.

Data workshop presented to wider audience the findings of MSP Data Study within the EU MSP Platform framework, as well as the first outcomes of BSR MSP Data group. The workshop concluded by examples of current practice and discussions about what would be the relevant solution for data harmonisation in the Baltic Sea region.

Presentations and speakers:

Moderator: Lodewijk Abspoel, Senior policy advisor MSP and EU IMP, Netherlands ministry for Infrastructure and the Environment, DG spatial development and water affairs

Activities at sea are 10 times more expensive than on land. Below the water surface: a 100 times. Time to take this into consideration when using maritime spatial planning (MSP) for tapping into blue growth potentials. In particular when looking at the energy transition. Maritime spatial development is of course sustainable and looks at the business side of the use of our seas. Best way to get a feel is to get your feet wet and hands out of the pockets. This working session therefore features a MSP challenge game to help you discover more about maritime spatial development and its’ potential for sustainable blue growth.

CONCLUDING PLENARY

video file is available here >>

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